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Toy fruits

 
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At this point, I’m trying not to get my hopes up. The masses of green tomatoes are still on the vine and slowly thinking about turning yellow and the plants are still blooming. I spend a little time every day picking at the plants, trying to shock them into ripening the fruit. Maybe I’m being too nice and I need to be more brutal to actually shock them. I’m sure it’s just a matter of time before I get fed up and start poking until they turn black.

The fun part of this year has been the tomatillo plant. The yellow flowers are starting to turn into little green lanterns, dangling everywhere. They’re so cute I can hardly stand to think about picking them, but as soon as one looks the least bit ripe I’m going to grab it. Those are one of my favorite fruits. Now all I need is a way to tell if there’s something in the lanterns worth picking.

 
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The hubbard plant is also going nuts. The two squash I hand fertilized are growing. If they get large enough to pick, I’m sure we’ll have many days of squash lingering in the cool room. The ones we picked last year were 7 pounds or so apiece. Each made 4 full meals with ample leftovers. In fact, I think there may be quarters left in the freezer. I wonder – does pumpkin bread translate well if other squashes are used?

Originally published at my blog. You can comment here or there.


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You got me thinking, how DO you tell when a tomatillo is ready to pick? People around here find them mystifying just in the grocery store. Once a cashier said she thinks I'm the only person who buys them, which I don't think is true, but I bet it's not far off the mark.
What's your favorite way to cook Hubbard squash?

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